Scheduling (computing) - Operating System Scheduler Implementations

Operating System Scheduler Implementations

The algorithm used may be as simple as round-robin in which each process is given equal time (for instance 1 ms, usually between 1 ms and 100 ms) in a cycling list. So, process A executes for 1 ms, then process B, then process C, then back to process A.

More advanced algorithms take into account process priority, or the importance of the process. This allows some processes to use more time than other processes. The kernel always uses whatever resources it needs to ensure proper functioning of the system, and so can be said to have infinite priority. In SMP(symmetric multiprocessing) systems, processor affinity is considered to increase overall system performance, even if it may cause a process itself to run more slowly. This generally improves performance by reducing cache thrashing.

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Scheduling (computing) - Operating System Scheduler Implementations - Summary
... Operating System Preemption Algorithm Amiga OS Yes Prioritized Round-robin scheduling FreeBSD Yes Multilevel feedback queue Linux pre-2.6 Yes Multilevel ...

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