Sarrusophone

The sarrusophone is a family of transposing musical instruments patented and placed into production by Pierre-Louis Gautrot in 1856. It was named after the French bandmaster Pierre-Auguste Sarrus (1813–1876) who is credited with the concept of the instrument, though it is not clear whether Sarrus benefited financially from this association. The instrument was intended to serve as a replacement in wind bands for the oboe and bassoon which, at that time, lacked the carrying power required for outdoor band music.

Read more about Sarrusophone:  Sizes and Ranges, Construction, Present Status, Rothphone

Other articles related to "sarrusophone":

Contrabass Sarrusophone
... The Eb contrabass sarrusophone was the only sarrusophone that was ever mass produced in the United States ...
Sarrusophone - Rothphone
... known as the rothophone or saxarrusophone, is a sarrusophone hybrid that is rewrapped to look like a saxophone ... They are, nowadays, even less common than the sarrusophone ... It had a less conical and wide bore than both the saxophone and the sarrusophone ...
Soprano Sarrusophone
... The Soprano sarrusophone is a member of the sarrusophone family ... Bassoon Semi contrabassoon Contrabassoon Contraforte Contrabassophone Reed contrabass Sarrusophone Rothphone Tromboon European classical (historical) Aulos Baroque oboe Bassanelli Cornamuse ...
List Of Aerophones By Hornbostel–Sachs Number - Aerophones (4) - Non-free Aerophones (wind Instruments Proper) (42) - Reed Aerophones (422)
... Bassoon Tenoroon Contrabassoon Bombarde Cromorne Sarrusophone Sopranino sarrusophone Soprano sarrusophone Alto sarrusophone Tenor sarrusophone Baritone sarrusophone Bass sarrusophone Contrabass sarrusophone ...
Alto Sarrusophone
... The E-flat alto sarrusophone is the alto member of the sarrusophone family of metal double reed instruments ...