Sarah Jessica Parker - Career - Fashion Industry

Fashion Industry

Endorsements

In 2000, Parker hosted the MTV Movie Awards, appearing in fourteen different outfits during the show.

She has also become the face of many of the world's biggest fashion brands through her work in a variety of advertising campaigns. In August 2003, Parker signed a lucrative deal with Garnier to appear in TV and print advertising promoting their Nutrisse hair products.

In early 2004, shortly after the last season of Sex and the City wrapped up, Parker signed a $38 million contract with the Gap. It was the first multi-season contract in the clothing company’s history, in which Parker was to appear in their upcoming fall ads, and continue until the Spring of 2005. The endorsement sparked many levels of criticism from the public; the glamorous, urban-chic fashionista that her character Carrie Bradshaw has branded her with, was ironic considering the Gap maintains an image that does not promote high-end fashion. Wendy Liebmann, president of WSL strategic retail, suggested that the Gap “felt the need for an iconic but contemporary face to represent . . . . they were perhaps feeling a little insecure, a little in need of some high luster around the brand". However, the ad campaigns were a success, and Parker had given the Gap a new, fresh face that appeared in many commercials, online and print ads, and other promotions.

In March 2005, Parker’s contract with the Gap ended, and was replaced with then 17-year old British soul singer Joss Stone. A rising star at the time, Stone’s replacing of Parker was a puzzling move to the public. The company then stated that “While Gap will always seek partnerships with celebrities, musicians and rising stars, we don’t have any future plans to sign a single person to a multi-season deal like the unique and special relationship we enjoyed with Sarah Jessica”.

Parker released her own perfume in 2005, called "Lovely". In March 2007, Parker announced the launch of her own fashion line, "Bitten", in partnership with discount clothing chain Steve & Barry's. The line, featuring clothing items and accessories under $20, launched on June 7, 2007, exclusively at Steve and Barry's.

In July 2007, following the success of "Lovely," Parker released her second fragrance "Covet." In 2007, Parker was a guest on Project Runway for the second challenge. In 2008, Covet Pure Bloom was released as continuous series of Covet. In February 2009, as part of the "Lovely" collection, Parker launched a series of three new fragrances called "Dawn", "Endless" and "Twilight".

SJP Shoes

In 2013 Sarah Jessica Parker announced she was launching her own footwear range, title "SJP". The SJP range will be sold exclusively to Nordstrom in early 2014.

Read more about this topic:  Sarah Jessica Parker, Career

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