Sanjeev Kumar - Personal Life and Background

Personal Life and Background

Sanjeev Kumar was born as Haribhai Jariwala in Surat Gujarat to a Gujarati family. His first home was in Surat and family based in Mumbai. A stint in the film school took him to Bollywood, where he eventually became a movie star. He remained a bachelor all his life and died of a massive heart attack on 6th November in 1985. He has two younger brothers and a sister.

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