San Beda Red Lions - Bedan Symbols - Indian Yell

Indian Yell

The Cuerba brothers, both Bedans, composed the Indian Yell in 1947 after the liberation from the Japanese empire. The Indian Yell was initially solely performed on drums accompanied by cheers from the students. However, this made the cheer somewhat lacking in power and needed something to rejuvenate the audience. So they changed the sound of the yell and incorporated a horn section. Accompanied by the tomahawk chop, the Indian Yell became more lively, intimidating, and full of spirit.

The Indian Yell is San Beda's romanticized version of the Indian war whoop. It mimics the native Indian war chants and vocalization techniques designed to intimidate the opponent. North American Indian war chants are verbalization of tunes that implore the great spirits to help them in battle. The romanticized Bedan Indian Yell is believed to have been inspired by the Plains Indian.

The Indian war whoop also gave rise to various derivative chants, most especially the Lion's Roar. The Lion’s roar, with the simple "Wooohooo", also mimics primitive chants of Native American Indians. This is an indirect offspring of the Wahoos started by both Dartmouth College and the University of Virginia in the 1890s. Bedans popularized this aboriginal Native American form of chanting in the Philippine collegiate league and has spawned variations now used by many other schools.

The Native Americans were a courageous and defiant people. This is also true with the ancient Scottish warriors and their Red Lion Rampant. From the Old World (Europe), Bedans adopted the Red Lion while from the New World (North America) they adopted the Native Americans. Both are Red and both are symbols of Courage.

The ingredients were actually ripe for an Indian inspired theme to gain popularity and acceptance among Bedans. The Scouting movement, introduced to the country by the Americans, became very popular in San Beda College. Worldwide, the movement and the infatuation with North American Indian cultures grew hand in hand. According to Philip J. Deloria in Playing Indian, Indians became a major "lure" to recruit boys. In fact, North American Indian iconography is not only popular in the Scouting movement but in many aspects of the Euro-American psyche. Combining this infatuation, reinforced by the popularity of North American iconography in the movies, literature and American sports, led to the blossoming of an Indian inspired theme in San Beda.

Read more about this topic:  San Beda Red Lions, Bedan Symbols

Other articles related to "indian yell, yell":

History of San Beda College - School Traditions - Indian Yell
... The Cuerba brothers, both Bedans, composed the Indian Yell in 1947 after the liberation from the Japanese empire ... The Indian Yell was initially solely performed on drums accompanied by cheers from the students ... So they changed the sound of the yell and incorporated a horn section ...

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