Samarkand

Samarkand (Uzbek: Samarqand; Persian: سمرقند‎ from Sogdian: "Stone Fort" or "Rock Town") is the second-largest city in Uzbekistan and the capital of Samarqand Province. The city is most noted for its central position on the Silk Road between China and the West, and for being an Islamic centre for scholarly study. In the 14th century it became the capital of the empire of Timur (Tamerlane) and is the site of his mausoleum (the Gur-e Amir). The Bibi-Khanym Mosque (a modern replica) remains one of the city's most notable landmarks. The Registan was the ancient center of the city.

In 2001, UNESCO added the city to its World Heritage List as Samarkand – Crossroads of Cultures.

Read more about Samarkand:  Etymology, History, Main Sights, Climate, Notable People, Sister Cities

Other articles related to "samarkand":

Architecture Of Central Asia - Timurid Architecture
... Spectacular and stately edifices erected by Timur and his successors in Samarkand and Herat helped to disseminate the influence of the Ilkhanid school of art in India, thus giving rise to the celebrated Moghol ... Ahmed Yasawi in present-day Kazakhstan and culminated in Timur's mausoleum Gur-e Amir in Samarkand ... is a characteristic of all major Timurid structures, notably the Shah-e Zendah in Samarkand and the mosque of Gowhar Shad in Meshed ...
Mongol Invasion Of Khwarezmia - Sieges of Bukhara, Samarkand, and Urgench
... Further, Genghis and Tolui, at the head of an army of roughly 50,000 men, skirted Samarkand and went westwards to lay siege to the city of Bukhara first ... After the fall of Bukhara, Genghis headed to the Khwarezmi capital of Samarkand and arrived in March 1220 ... Samarkand possessed significantly better fortifications and as many as 100,000 men defending ...
Samarkand Challenger
... The Samarkand Challenger is a tennis tournament held in Samarkand, Uzbekistan since 1996 ...
Thomas Of Mancasola
... in the Chagatai Khanate who became bishop of Samarkand ... a commendation from Eljigidey for the trip to Rome that saw him granted the bishopric of Samarkand ... this place was positively identified as Samarkand during the nineteenth century ...