Safavid Dynasty - Culture

Culture

See also: Safavid art
Persian arts
Visual arts
  • Painting
  • Miniatures
  • Calligraphy
Decorative arts
  • Jewelry
  • Metalworks
  • Embroidery
  • Motifs
  • Tileworks
  • Handicrafts
  • Pottery
  • Mirrorworks
Literature
  • Literature
  • Mythology
  • Folklore
  • Philosophy
Performance arts
  • Dance
  • Music
  • Cinema
  • Theatre
Other
  • Architecture
  • Cuisine
  • Carpets
  • Gardens

Read more about this topic:  Safavid Dynasty

Other articles related to "culture":

KAIST - Academics - Colleges - College of Cultural Science
... The College of Culture and Science is composed of two departments School of Humanities and Social Sciences and Graduate School of Culture and Technology ... The Graduate School of Culture and Technology also provides master and doctoral degree programs for the purpose of producing manpower of the nation’s. 40 lecturers), the Graduate School of Culture and Technology also has 4 full-time faculties, 5 visiting professors, 7 adjunct professors, and 89 master students and 36 doctoral ...
Vandalism - As Art
... vandalism in itself is illegal, it is often also an integral part of modern popular culture ... Friedrich Nietzsche himself meditated about the "fight against culture", wondering what could justify culture if it were to be destroyed in such a "senseless" manner (the arguments are culture is ... In this case, culture cannot be legitimised by art achievements, and Nietzsche writes "I {also} know what it means fighting against culture" ...
Yayoi Period - Features of Yayoi Culture
... Yayoi culture quickly spread to the main island of Honshū mixing with native Jōmon culture ... introduction of an irrigated, wet-rice culture from the Yangtze estuary in southern China via the Ryukyu Islands or Korean Peninsula ...

Famous quotes containing the word culture:

    The highest end of government is the culture of men.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    The time will come when the evil forms we have known can no more be organized. Man’s culture can spare nothing, wants all material. He is to convert all impediments into instruments, all enemies into power.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    All our civilization had meant nothing. The same culture that had nurtured the kindly enlightened people among whom I had been brought up, carried around with it war. Why should I not have known this? I did know it, but I did not believe it. I believed it as we believe we are going to die. Something that is to happen in some remote time.
    Mary Heaton Vorse (1874–1966)