Sacraments of The Catholic Church

The Sacraments of the Catholic Church are, the Roman Catholic Church teaches, "efficacious signs of grace, instituted by Christ and entrusted to the Church, by which divine life is dispensed to us. The visible rites by which the sacraments are celebrated signify and make present the graces proper to each sacrament. They bear fruit in those who receive them with the required dispositions."

Every individual is not able to receive every sacrament. The Roman Catholic Church affirms that Jesus Christ established "His life-giving Spirit upon His disciples and through Him has established His Body which is the Church as the universal sacrament of salvation". The Church has given us seven sacraments and teaches that Christ bestows on these sacraments particular graces, such as incorporation into Christ and the Church, forgiveness of sins, or consecration for a particular service.

While the Church itself is the universal sacrament of salvation, the sacraments of the Catholic Church in the strict sense are seven sacraments that "touch all the stages and all the important moments of Christian life: they give birth and increase, healing and mission to the Christian's life of faith". "The Church affirms that for believers the sacraments of the New Covenant are necessary for salvation", although not all are necessary for every individual, and has placed under anathema those who deny it: "If any one saith, that the sacraments of the New Law are not necessary unto salvation, but superfluous; and that, without them, or without the desire thereof, men obtain of God, through faith alone, the grace of justification;-though all (the sacraments) are not ineed necessary for every individual; let him be anathema."

The Church further teaches that the effect of a sacrament comes ex opere operato, by the very fact of being administered, regardless of the personal holiness of the minister administering it. However, a recipient's own lack of proper disposition to receive the grace conveyed can block the effectiveness of the sacrament in that person. The sacraments presuppose faith and through their words and ritual elements, nourish, strengthen and give expression to faith.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church lists the sacraments as follows: "The whole liturgical life of the Church revolves around the Eucharistic sacrifice and the sacraments. There are seven sacraments in the Church: Baptism, Confirmation or Chrismation, Eucharist, Penance, Anointing of the Sick, Holy Orders, and Matrimony."

Read more about Sacraments Of The Catholic Church:  Sacraments of Initiation, Validity and Liceity of Administration of The Sacraments

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Sacraments Of The Catholic Church - Validity and Liceity of Administration of The Sacraments
... As stated above, the effect of the sacraments comes ex opere operato (by the very fact of being administered) ... The belief that the validity of the sacrament is dependent upon the holiness of the administrator was rejected in the Donatist crisis ... However, an apparent administration of a sacrament is invalid, if the person acting as minister does not have the necessary power (as if a deacon were to ...

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