Ruthenians

Ruthenians

The English term Ruthenian, also Ruthene, also Rusyns, (Russian: Русины, Ukrainian: Русини, Руські, Rusyn: Русины); Latin Ruthenia, is a well established if sometimes obsolete exonym originally used for the people of Rus, primarily the medieval kingdom of Kievan Rus', comprising parts of modern-day Russia, Belarus, Poland, Slovakia and Ukraine. The term is culturally loaded and has various meanings in different contexts. For example, in 2008 a controversy arose accusing Ruthenian (Zakarpattia Oblast) archpriest Dmytro Sidor of the Moscow Patriarchy of anti-Ukrainian separatist activities.

Historically, Ruthenian was the ethnonym used for the East Slavic peoples who lived in Rus'. According to the Catholic Encyclopedia the term was used predominantly to refer to East Slavs of the Austro-Hungarian Empire or to Ukrainians or Little Russians of the Russian Empire as opposed to Great Russians centered on Moscow. With the emergence of Ukrainian nationalism in the mid nineteenth-century, the term went out of use in what is now eastern and central Ukraine, with modern-day western Ukraine (namely Carpathian Ruthenia) remaining part of Czechoslovakia prior to World War II. In the interbellum period the term was also used in the Second Polish Republic for people from the Kresy Wschodnie. Today it is predominantly used as autonym by the people of Zakarpattia Oblast and by some émigré populations outside of Ukraine. Its use has also been retained on a small scale for such groups as the Pannonian Rusyns and by Ruthenian Catholics using the Byzantine Rite under the Pope within the Catholic Church.

Read more about Ruthenians:  Etymology, Memorandum On Reinstating of Supcarpathian Rus

Other articles related to "ruthenian, ruthenians":

Alexander Dukhnovich - Assessment
... Dukhnovych is regarded to be one of the outstanding Ukrainian and Ruthenian humanists and educators ... In the words of Ivan Franko "he made everything so that forgotten Ruthenians revived spiritually" ... language nor did he wish to contribute to a creation of a literary language of Carpathian Ruthenians ...
Ruthenians - Memorandum On Reinstating of Supcarpathian Rus
... The criminal case (part 2, Art.110 of the Criminal Code) was initiated right after the 1st European Congress of Rusyns took place in Mukachevo on June 7, 2008 ... At that particular congress it was recognized the reinstating of the Zakarpattia's special status as special "territory of Rusys to the south of Carpathians" with self-government under the constitutional name Subcarpathian Rus ...
Radwan Coat Of Arms - History
... they could neither protect themselves from a skirmish with the Ruthenians, nor fight with them, inasmuch as their numbers were so much smaller ... So with all their heart they sprang toward the Ruthenians, whose knights were daunted by this attack but when they saw the small numbers against them, the Ruthenians ... The Ruthenians took this to mean a new army with fresh troops had joined the battle, and began to retreat and flee ...
Ukrainian Russophiles - Terminology
... apply the term to themselves, and called themselves Rusians or Ruthenians (Rusyny) ... coined such terms as Obshche-rossy (Common Russians) or Starorusyny (Old Ruthenians) to stress either the differences within their faction, referring to commonness with all Russias, or their unique stand ... The ethnonym Ruthenians for Ukrainian people had been accepted by both the Russophiles and the Moscowphiles for quite a long period of time ...
Boyko
... most of the population of the present day's Western Ukraine called themselves Ruthenians (Ukrainian Русини, Rusyny) ... Then the term "Ukrainian", that replaced the term "Ruthenians" in Eastern Ukraine a century earlier, became more common among Western Ruthenians/Ukrainians, including ... The Boyko language is based on the Ruthenian language, much influenced by the liturgic Old Church Slavonic language ...