Rugby League Positions

Rugby League Positions

A rugby league football team consists of thirteen players on the field, with four substitutes on the bench. Players are divided into two general categories: "forwards" and "backs".

Forwards are generally chosen for their size and strength. They are expected to run with the ball, to attack, and to make tackles. Forwards are often required to make openings for the backs and improving in field position. Backs are usually smaller and faster, though a big, fast player can be of advantage in the backs. Their roles require speed and ball-playing skills, rather than just strength, to take advantage of the field position gained by the forwards.

Read more about Rugby League Positions:  Names and Numbering, Backs, Forwards, Substitutes, Utility

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