Rubber

Rubber

Natural rubber, also called India rubber or caoutchouc, as initially produced, consists of suitable polymers of the organic compound isoprene with minor impurities of other organic compounds plus water. Forms of polyisoprene that are useful as natural rubbers are classified as elastomers. Currently the rubber is harvested mainly in the form of the latex from certain trees. The latex is a sticky, milky colloid drawn off by making incisions into the bark and collecting the fluid in vessels. This process is called "tapping". The latex then is refined into rubber ready for commercial processing. Natural rubber is used extensively in many applications and products, either alone or in combination with other materials. In most of its useful forms it has a large stretch ratio, high resilience, and is extremely waterproof.

Read more about RubberVarieties, Discovery of Commercial Potential, Properties, Chemical Makeup, Current Sources, Uses, Vulcanization, Allergic Reactions, See Also

Other articles related to "rubber, rubbers":

Rubber - See Also
... Akron, Ohio, center of the rubber industry in the USA Condoms, also called "rubbers" Crepe rubber Ebonite Emulsion dispersion Fordlândia, failed attempt to establish a rubber plantation in ...

Famous quotes containing the word rubber:

    First, are you our sort of a person?
    Do you wear
    A glass eye, false teeth or a crutch,
    A brace or a hook,
    Rubber breasts or a rubber crotch,

    Stitches to show something’s missing?
    Sylvia Plath (1932–1963)

    Time for the flat-headed man. I recognize that listener,
    Him with the platitudes and rubber doughnuts,
    Melting at the knees, a varicose horror.
    Hello, hello. My nerves knew you, dear boy.
    Have you come to unhinge my shadow?
    Theodore Roethke (1908–1963)

    The idea that information can be stored in a changing world without an overwhelming depreciation of its value is false. It is scarcely less false than the more plausible claim that after a war we may take our existing weapons, fill their barrels with cylinder oil, and coat their outsides with sprayed rubber film, and let them statically await the next emergency.
    Norbert Wiener (1894–1964)