Royal Standard of The Netherlands

Royal Standard Of The Netherlands

The Royal Standard of the Netherlands is the official flag of the monarch. This standard is a non-personal distinctive flag for the Sovereign of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Non-personal means that it is not changed from reign to reign.

The Royal Standard is a square orange flag, divided in four quarters by a nassau-blue cross. These colours refer to the principality of Orange (in France) and the principality of Nassau (in Germany) from which the present royal family originates.

In the centre of the flag is the (small) coat of arms of the Kingdom, which originates from the Nassau arms, surmounted by a royal crown and surrounded by the insignia of the Grand Cross of the Military Order of Willem. Each quarter shows a bugle-horn which originates in arms of the principality of Orange.

The Royal Standard is flown above Huis ten Bosch Palace in The Hague (the King's private residence) and above Noordeinde Palace in The Hague (the King's official residence) when the Sovereign is in the Netherlands, but not necessarily when he is actually resident.

Besides these two residences, the Royal Standard is flown on other palaces, castles or estates where and when the King is actually staying


Read more about Royal Standard Of The Netherlands:  Standards of Other Members of The Royal Family, Historical Standards

Other articles related to "royal standard of the netherlands, standard, of the netherlands, royal":

Royal Standard Of The Netherlands - Historical Standards - Prince Bernhard of The Netherlands
... Standard Use Description Prince-consort of The Netherlands 1948-2004 A quadrangle bearing an orange cross ... Centered upon the cross is the coat of arms of The Netherlands, topped by a royal crown ...

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