Roderick Strong - Early Life

Early Life

Lindsey was born in Wisconsin, but relocated to Florida at a young age. Following a troubled childhood, Lindsey graduated from Riverview High School, where he played American football, He went on to attend the University of South Florida on an academic scholarship. Lindsey majored in Business for two years before dropping out.

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