Roanoke Metropolitan Area

Roanoke Metropolitan Area

The Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area is a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in Virginia as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The Roanoke MSA is sometimes referred to as the Roanoke Valley, even though the Roanoke MSA occupies a larger area than the Roanoke Valley. It is geographically similar to the area known as the Roanoke Region of Virginia, but while the latter includes Alleghany County, the former does not. As of the 2000 census, the MSA had a population of 288,309 (though a July 1, 2009 estimate placed the population at 300,399).

Figures through 2000 do not include Franklin County (50,345 est. 2005 population) and Craig County (5,154 est. 2005 population). The Census Bureau has since added them to the Roanoke MSA, which is the fourth largest in Virginia (behind Northern Virginia, Hampton Roads, and the Greater Richmond area), and the largest in the western half of the state. Its current rank is 201 among all 363 MSAs. The Roanoke, VA MSA population changed from 288,471 in 2000 to 298,694 in 2008, a 3.54 percent change. The population is projected to be 324,882 in 2020, a 12.62 percent change between 2000 and 2020.

Read more about Roanoke Metropolitan Area:  MSA Components, Politics, Demographics

Other articles related to "roanoke metropolitan area":

Roanoke Metropolitan Area - Demographics
... The median income for a household in the MSA was $40,251, and the median income for a family was $47,248 ... Males had a median income of $32,294 versus $23,427 for females ...

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