Rhythm of The Pride Lands

Rhythm of the Pride Lands is an audio CD released on February 28, 1995 by Walt Disney Records, a "sequel" to the original motion picture soundtrack of the animated film The Lion King. The CD, was originally an independent project developed by Jay Rifkin and Lebo M and included songs and performances inspired by, but not featured in the film. As the project developed Disney came on board and supported the project. Most of the tracks were composed by African composer Lebo M and producer Jay Rifkin and focused primarily on the African influences of the film's original music, with most songs being sung either partially or entirely in various African languages. Several songs featured in the album would later have incarnations in other The Lion King-oriented projects, inspiring Julie Taymor's stage musical or the direct-to-video sequels, such as "He Lives in You". As of April 1997, the album had sold more than 900,000 copies and by October 1998 was certified platinum.

"Warthog Rhapsody", which delved deeper into the origins of Pumbaa than "Hakuna Matata" did, was originally recorded to be included in the movie, but was cut out during storyboard and never animated. The song was later reworked with new lyrics into the song "That's All I Need" for The Lion King 1½.

Rhythm of the Pride Lands was initially printed in a very limited quantity. Today it is available digitally through the iTunes Store.

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Rhythm Of The Pride Lands - Track Listing
... M with Khanyo Maphumulo "Lea Halalela (Holy Land)" – 602 ( sample) Music and lyrics by Hans Zimmer and Lebo M Arranged by Hans Zimmer and John Van Tongeren Produced by ...

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