Retail Week

Retail Week is a UK-based news magazine, website and data service covering the retail industry.

Founded in 1988 by financial journalist Patience Wheatcroft and her husband Tony Salter, it is now owned by the business magazine publisher EMAP.

The magazine is published every Friday. Retail Week has an average net circulation of 7,785 (ABC Certified) and a readership of 39,000.

Subscribers are primarily retail company board directors and senior managers, as well as suppliers to retailers and investment analysts.

Retail Week launched a news website, Retail-week.com, in 2004. The site was redesigned and relaunched in 2007 and again in 2009. Retail-week.com has 110,000 unique users and 419,000 page impressions per month.

The Retail Week Knowledge Bank has been part of the Retail Week website since 2010. This is a comprehensive database of the UK’s top 200 retailers and features analysis on financials, store numbers, margins and key personnel, while also offering insight into retailers’ strategies.

Chris Brook-Carter has been editor in chief of Retail Week since March 2012. The previous editors were Tim Danaher, Patience Wheatcroft (1988–1992), Ian McGarrigle (1992–1996), Kate Oppenheim (1996–1999) and Neill Denny (1999–2004). Retail Week runs an event called Retail Week Live once a year for leaders of the retail industry.

Other articles related to "retail week":

ASOS.com - Honours & Awards
... Best Trendsetter' by Sunday Times Mar 2002 - Retail Week Awards - Best Newcomer Finalist Sep 2002 - E-Commerce Awards - Highly Commended Oct 2004 - AIM Awards - Best Performing Share Feb 2005 - More ... Year Awards June 2011 - International Solution of the Year - Retail Week Technology Awards June 2011 - Best Social Media Strategy - New Media Age Awards June ...

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