Resistance Is Futile - Borg Collective

Borg Collective

Also referred to as the "hive mind" or "collective consciousness", the Borg Collective is a civilization with a group mind. Each Borg individual, or drone, is linked to the collective by a sophisticated subspace network that ensures each member is given constant supervision and guidance. The collective is broadcast over a subspace domain similar to that utilized by the transporter. Being part of the collective offers significant biomedical advantages to the individual drones. The mental energy of the group consciousness can help an injured or damaged drone heal or regenerate damaged body parts or technology. The collective consciousness not only gives them the ability to "share the same thoughts", but also to adapt with great speed to defensive tactics used against them.

Read more about this topic:  Resistance Is Futile

Other articles related to "borg collective, collective, borg":

Borg (Star Trek) - Borg Collective
... Also referred to as the "hive mind" or "collective consciousness", the Borg Collective is a civilization with a group mind ... Each Borg individual, or drone, is linked to the collective by a sophisticated subspace network that ensures each member is given constant supervision and guidance ... The collective is broadcast over a subspace domain similar to that utilized by the transporter ...
Drone (Star Trek: Voyager) - Plot
... The crew is unaware that the emitter has gained some of Seven's Borg nanoprobes from the malfunctioning transporter, and it begins assimilating the equipment in the ... and discover that the nanoprobes have created a Borg maturation chamber, rapidly growing a Borg drone from the tissue sample ... of the emitter, fused in the drone as part of its cerebral cortex, and should the Borg of this timeline gain that information, the entire galaxy would be doomed ...

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