Republic of China Presidential Election, 2004 - Demographic Trends and Public Opinion

Demographic Trends and Public Opinion

On the day of the election, each member of the electorate (most adult citizens aged 20 and upwards) stamped one from the two choices of president/vice-president tickets on the ballot. Since Taiwan does not provide absentee ballots, large numbers of Taiwanese expatriates living in North America and Mainland China returned to Taiwan to vote. Typical estimates indicate that about 20,000 people travelled from North America and between 100,000 and 150,000 people travelled from Mainland China. Most analysts believe that the voters from North America would be split evenly between the two candidates, but that those from Mainland China voted overwhelmingly for Pan-Blue.

Polls indicated that Taiwan is split with about one-third identifying themselves as Pan-Blue, one-third identifying themselves as Pan-Green, and one-third as centrist. They also show very little cross-party voting with over 90% of people who identify with one party group stating that they will vote for the party.

Pan-Blue tends to do well among Mainlanders, Taiwanese aborigines, and Hakka. They also have the support of people from age 30-50, among the very rich, and very poor, and among people from northern and eastern Taiwan. Pan-Green does well among people 20-30 and people from 50-60, among people with formal education like doctors, and among people from southern Taiwan.

The margin in favor of Pan-Blue narrowed significantly after the 228 Hand-in-Hand Rally, with some polls showing Pan-Green in the lead. Taiwanese law forbids publishing any poll results, either current or historical, less than ten days before the election.

Read more about this topic:  Republic Of China Presidential Election, 2004

Other articles related to "demographic trends and public opinion":

ROC Presidential Election, 2004 - Demographic Trends and Public Opinion
... Polls indicated that Taiwan is split with about one-third identifying themselves as Pan-Blue, one-third identifying themselves as Pan-Green, and one-third as centrist ... They also show very little cross-party voting with over 90% of people who identify with one party group stating that they will vote for the party ...

Famous quotes containing the words public opinion, opinion, public and/or trends:

    Public opinion, a vulgar, impertinent, anonymous tyrant who deliberately makes life unpleasant for anyone who is not content to be the average man.
    —W.R. (William Ralph)

    The superiority of one man’s opinion over another’s is never so great as when the opinion is about a woman.
    Henry James (1843–1916)

    The public easily confuses him who fishes in troubled waters with him who draws up water from the depths.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)

    Power-worship blurs political judgement because it leads, almost unavoidably, to the belief that present trends will continue. Whoever is winning at the moment will always seem to be invincible.
    George Orwell (1903–1950)