Relieving

Some articles on relieving:

Battle Of Rowton Heath
... the Royalists, with heavy losses and Charles prevented from relieving the Siege of Chester ... Chester, his only remaining port, was under siege, he marched there with the intent of relieving the defenders, ordering 3,000 horse under the command of Marmaduke ... This defeat prevented Charles from relieving the defenders in Chester, which fell to the Parliamentarians on 3 February 1646 ...
Relief Valve - Technical Terms
... The relieving pressure is small and near the atmospheric pressure ... The relieving pressure is small, negative and near the atmospheric pressure ... The relieving pressure is small, negative or positive, and near the atmospheric pressure ...
Early Victorian Workhouses - Admission and Discharge
... Each Poor Law Union employed one or more relieving officers, whose job it was to visit those applying for assistance and assess what relief, if any, they should be given ... were the casual wards for tramps and vagrants and the relieving rooms, where paupers were housed until they had been examined by a medical officer ... Conditions in the casual wards were worse than in the relieving rooms and deliberately designed to discourage vagrants, who were considered potential ...
Chelsea–Hackney Line - History - 2010s
... at both ends of the route, with Clapham Junction more of a priority than relieving the District line, and relieving the Victoria line at its northern end more than the ... The regional option, as well as relieving the South West Main Line, seeks to relieve congested sections of the Northern line and Piccadilly line by removing passengers ...
Heat Treating - Techniques - Annealing - Stress Relieving
... Stress relieving is a technique to remove or reduce the internal stresses created in a metal ... Stress relieving is usually accomplished by heating a metal below the lower critical temperature and then cooling uniformly ...

Famous quotes containing the word relieving:

    Of all the animals with which this globe is peopled, there is none towards whom nature seems, at first sight, to have exercised more cruelty than towards man, in the numberless wants and necessities with which she has loaded him, and in the slender means which she affords to the relieving these necessities.
    David Hume (1711–1776)