Regular Clergy

Regular clergy, or just regulars, is applied in the Roman Catholic Church to clerics who follow a "rule" (Latin regula) in their life, those who are members of religious institutes. Formerly, it meant those who were members of Catholic religious orders, institutes in which at some least of the members made solemn profession. It contrasts with secular clergy.

Read more about Regular Clergy:  Terminology and History

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Regular Clergy - Terminology and History
... Benedict procured for Benedictine monks at an early period the name of "regulars" ... it was natural to call those who added religious poverty to their common life regulars, and those who gave up the common life, seculars ... Sometimes also the name "regulars" was applied to the canons regular to distinguish them from monks ...

Famous quotes containing the words clergy and/or regular:

    I never saw, heard, nor read, that the clergy were beloved in any nation where Christianity was the religion of the country. Nothing can render them popular, but some degree of persecution.
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    “I couldn’t afford to learn it,” said the Mock Turtle with a sigh. “I only took the regular course.”
    “What was that?” inquired Alice.
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