Region - Regions in Human Geography

Regions in Human Geography

Human geography is a branch of geography that focuses on the study of patterns and processes that shape human interaction with various discrete environments. It encompasses human, political, cultural, social, and economic aspects among others that are often clearly delineated. While the major focus of human geography is not the physical landscape of the Earth (see physical geography), it is hardly possible to discuss human geography without referring to the physical landscape on which human activities are being played out, and environmental geography is emerging as a link between the two. Regions of human geography can be divided into many broad categories, such as:

  • Cultural geography
  • Demography
  • Development geography
  • Economic geography
  • Ethnography
  • Geopolitics
  • Health geography
  • Historical geography
  • Language geography
  • Religion geography
  • Social geography
  • Time geography
  • Tourism geography
  • Transportation geography
  • Urban geography

Read more about this topic:  Region

Other articles related to "regions in human geography, region":

Regions in Human Geography - Military Regions
... Military district In military usage, a region is shorthand for the name of a military formation larger than an Army Group and smaller than an Army Theater or simply Theater ... The full name of the military formation is Army Region ... The size of an Army Region can vary widely but is generally somewhere between about 1 million and 3 million soldiers ...

Famous quotes containing the words geography, regions and/or human:

    Yet America is a poem in our eyes; its ample geography dazzles the imagination, and it will not wait long for metres.
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    In place of a world, there is a city, a point, in which the whole life of broad regions is collecting while the rest dries up. In place of a type-true people, born of and grown on the soil, there is a new sort of nomad, cohering unstably in fluid masses, the parasitical city dweller, traditionless, utterly matter-of-fact, religionless, clever, unfruitful, deeply contemptuous of the countryman and especially that highest form of countryman, the country gentleman.
    Oswald Spengler (1880–1936)

    The psychoanalysis of individual human beings, however, teaches us with quite special insistence that the god of each of them is formed in the likeness of his father, that his personal relation to God depends on his relation to his father in the flesh and oscillates and changes along with that relation, and that at bottom God is nothing other than an exalted father.
    Sigmund Freud (1856–1939)