Reflector (photography) - Techniques With Board Reflectors

Techniques With Board Reflectors

Reflectors vary enormously in size, colour, reflectivity and portability. In tabletop still life photography, small mirrors and card stock are used extensively, both to reduce lighting contrast and create highlights on reflective subjects such as glassware and jewelry. Larger-scale subjects such as motor vehicles require the use of huge "flats", often requiring specialised motorized winches to position them accurately.
Location photography calls for much more portable materials and a large range of lightweight, folding reflectors are commercially available in a variety of colors.

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Other articles related to "techniques with board reflectors, reflectors, reflector":

Bounce Board - Techniques With Board Reflectors - Outdoor Techniques
... Walls also make ideal reflectors outdoors, reflecting sunlight back upon a subject and reducing shadows (and hence overall contrast) according to the color, size and proximity of the wall ... is the portable, lightweight, collapsible reflector, commercially available in a range of sizes and colors, or improvised using a sheet of card stock or even a bed sheet ... Stands may be erected to retain these reflectors, although it is often much more convenient and practical to have an assistant hold and manipulate them ...

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