Red Coat (British Army)

Red Coat (British Army)

Red coat or Redcoat is a historical term used to refer to soldiers of the British Army because of the red uniforms formerly worn by the majority of regiments. From the late 17th century to the early 20th century, the uniform of most British soldiers, (apart from artillery, rifles and light cavalry), included a madder red coat or coatee. From 1870 onwards, the more vivid shade of scarlet was adopted for all ranks, having previously been worn only by officers, sergeants and all ranks of some cavalry regiments.

Read more about Red Coat (British Army):  History, Modern Use in Commonwealth Armies, Red Coat As A Symbol, American Revolution, Rationale For Red, Material Used, Other Military Usage, Sources, See Also

Famous quotes containing the words coat and/or red:

    I told him that Goldsmith had said,... “As I take my shoes from the shoemaker, and my coat from the taylor, so I take my religion from the priest.” I regretted this loose way of talking. JOHNSON. Sir, he knows nothing; he has made up his mind about nothing.”
    Samuel Johnson (1709–1784)

    If the red slayer think he slays,
    Or if the slain think he is slain,
    They know not well the subtle ways
    I keep, and pass, and turn again.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)