Real-time Operating System

A real-time operating system (RTOS) is an operating system (OS) intended to serve real-time application requests.

A key characteristic of an RTOS is the level of its consistency concerning the amount of time it takes to accept and complete an application's task; the variability is jitter. A hard real-time operating system has less jitter than a soft real-time operating system. The chief design goal is not high throughput, but rather a guarantee of a soft or hard performance category. An RTOS that can usually or generally meet a deadline is a soft real-time OS, but if it can meet a deadline deterministically it is a hard real-time OS.

An RTOS has an advanced algorithm for scheduling. Scheduler flexibility enables a wider, computer-system orchestration of process priorities, but a real-time OS is more frequently dedicated to a narrow set of applications. Key factors in a real-time OS are minimal interrupt latency and minimal thread switching latency; a real-time OS is valued more for how quickly or how predictably it can respond than for the amount of work it can perform in a given period of time.

Read more about Real-time Operating System:  Design Philosophies, Scheduling, Intertask Communication and Resource Sharing, Interrupt Handlers and The Scheduler, Memory Allocation, Examples

Other articles related to "operating systems":

Real-time Operating System - Examples
... An early example of a large-scale real-time operating system was the Transaction Processing Facility developed by American Airlines and IBM for the ... the best known, most widely deployed, real-time operating systems are LynxOS OSE QNX RTLinux VxWorks Windows CE See the list of real-time operating systems for a comprehensive list ... Also, see the list of operating systems for all types of operating systems ...

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