Rapid Transit in Hungary

Rapid Transit In Hungary

The Budapest Metro (Hungarian: Budapesti metrĂ³) is the rapid transit system in the Hungarian capital Budapest. It is the second oldest electrified underground railway system in the world, only the City & South London Railway (now part of the London Underground) of 1890 pre-dates it. Its iconic Line 1, dating from 1896, was declared a World Heritage Site in 2002.

Read more about Rapid Transit In Hungary:  Lines, History

Other articles related to "rapid transit":

Examples of Tunnels - In History
... The tunnel is still in excellent condition and is being considered for reuse by Merseyrail rapid transit rail system, with maybe an underground station cut into the ... Used until 1972 it is still in excellent condition, being considered for reuse by the Merseyrail rapid transit rail system ... See also the rapid transit history ...
Green Line (CTA) - History
... This first section of the Chicago and South Side Rapid Transit Railroad between Wabash Avenue and State Street went into service on June 6, 1892 ... The Lake Street Elevated was Chicago's second rapid transit line ... On July 31, 1949, during the North-South rapid transit service revision by the CTA, the Howard-Englewood/Jackson Park route was created, operating via the State Street Subway ...

Famous quotes containing the words rapid and/or transit:

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    —D.H. (David Herbert)