Rankine Cycle - Organic Rankine Cycle

Organic Rankine Cycle

The organic Rankine cycle (ORC) uses an organic fluid such as n-pentane or toluene in place of water and steam. This allows use of lower-temperature heat sources, such as solar ponds, which typically operate at around 70–90 °C. The efficiency of the cycle is much lower as a result of the lower temperature range, but this can be worthwhile because of the lower cost involved in gathering heat at this lower temperature. Alternatively, fluids can be used that have boiling points above water, and this may have thermodynamic benefits. See, for example, mercury vapour turbine.

The Rankine cycle does not restrict the working fluid in its definition, so the inclusion of an “organic” cycle is simply a marketing concept that should not be regarded as a separate thermodynamic cycle.

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Organic Rankine Cycle - See Also
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