Quincy, Illinois - Architecture

Architecture

As Quincy's population exploded during the mass migration from Germany, its culture was changed by the new immigrants, who brought styles of their home country. The South Side German Historic District has much of the city's historical architecture. Other significant buildings exist: Temple B’nai Sholom is one of America's earliest Moorish Revival synagogues. The Quincy Museum located on Historic Maine Street was featured on a cover of National Geographic as one of the ten most architecturally significant corners in the United States. From 14th to 24th streets, Maine Street is notable for the number of restored homes dating back to the 19th century.

The Villa Katherine Castle is a small Moorish castle situated on the bluff overlooking the Mississippi River. It is a rarity to find an example of Mediterranean architecture in the Midwest.

The "Gem City" has been twice recognized as an All-American City. It has a range of architecture, including several Gothic style churches. The city is home to Quincy University, a Catholic Franciscan College founded in 1860, John Wood Community College, and several other smaller colleges.

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Famous quotes containing the word architecture:

    They can do without architecture who have no olives nor wines in the cellar.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The two elements the traveler first captures in the big city are extrahuman architecture and furious rhythm. Geometry and anguish. At first glance, the rhythm may be confused with gaiety, but when you look more closely at the mechanism of social life and the painful slavery of both men and machines, you see that it is nothing but a kind of typical, empty anguish that makes even crime and gangs forgivable means of escape.
    Federico García Lorca (1898–1936)

    Polarized light showed the secret architecture of bodies; and when the second-sight of the mind is opened, now one color or form or gesture, and now another, has a pungency, as if a more interior ray had been emitted, disclosing its deep holdings in the frame of things.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)