Protestant Work Ethic

The Protestant work ethic (or the Puritan work ethic) is a concept in theology, sociology, economics and history which emphasizes hard work, frugality and prosperity as a display of a person's salvation in the Christian faith. The phrase was initially coined in 1904 by Max Weber in his book The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism.

It is argued that Protestants, beginning with Martin Luther, had reconceptualised worldly work as a duty which benefits both the individual and society as a whole. Thus, the Catholic idea of good works was transformed into an obligation to work diligently as a sign of grace. Whereas Catholicism teaches that good works are required of Catholics to be saved (viewing salvation as a future event), the Reformers taught that good works were only a consequence of an already-received salvation.

However, the Calvinist theologians taught that only those who were predestined (cf. the Calvinist concept of double predestination) to be saved would be saved. Since it was impossible to know who was predestined, the notion developed that it might be possible to discern that a person was elect (predestined) by observing their way of life. Hard work and frugality were thought to be two important consequences of being one of the elect; thus, Protestants were attracted to these qualities.

Read more about Protestant Work EthicHistory, Support, Criticism

Other articles related to "protestant work ethic, protestant, protestants, work":

Protestant Work Ethic - Criticism
... See also The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism#Criticisms The economist Joseph Schumpeter argues that capitalism began in Italy in the 14th century, not in the Protestant areas of Europe ... abstract to this states that the literacy gap between Protestants (as a result of the Reformation) and Catholics sufficiently explains the economic gaps, and that the "Results hold when we exploit ...
Kenneth Lee Pike - Work
... language unknown to him would be brought in to work with Pike ... He pointed out that sometimes he did more of the work of a horse, other times he did more of the work of a donkey, but he was always both (Headland 2001508) ...
Industrial Revolution - Causes - Causes For Occurrence in Britain - Protestant Work Ethic
... believed in progress, technology and hard work ... The existence of this class is often linked to the Protestant work ethic (see Max Weber) and the particular status of the Baptists and the dissenting ... of the government, they were considered fellow Protestants, to a limited extent, by many in the middle class, such as traditional financiers or other businessmen ...
Work - Name
... Weorc or Work (Anglo-Saxon leader), who gave his name to Workington or 'Weorc-inga-tun', meaning the 'tun' (settlement) of the 'Weorcingas' (the people of Weorc or Work) ...
Georgius Agricola - De Re Metallica
... His most famous work, the De re metallica libri xii long remained a standard work, and marks its author as one of the most accomplished chemists of his time ... The work is a complete and systematic treatise on mining and extractive metallurgy, illustrated with many fine and interesting woodcuts which illustrate every conceivable process to extract ores from the ground ... Until that time, Pliny's work Historia Naturalis was the main source of information on metals and mining techniques, and Agricola made numerous references to the Roman encyclopedia ...

Famous quotes containing the words ethic, protestant and/or work:

    I’m a Sunday School teacher, and I’ve always known that the structure of law is founded on the Christian ethic that you shall love the Lord your God and your neighbor as yourself—a very high and perfect standard. We all know the fallibility of man, and the contentions in society, as described by Reinhold Niebuhr and many others, don’t permit us to achieve perfection.
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