Probable Prime

Probable Prime

In number theory, a probable prime (PRP) is an integer that satisfies a specific condition also satisfied by all prime numbers. Different types of probable primes have different specific conditions. While there may be probable primes that are composite (called pseudoprimes), the condition is generally chosen in order to make such exceptions rare.

Fermat's test for compositeness, which is based on Fermat's little theorem, works as follows: given an integer n, choose some integer a coprime to n and calculate an − 1 modulo n. If the result is different from 1, n is composite. If it is 1, n may or may not be prime; n is then called a (weak) probable prime to base a.

Read more about Probable PrimeProperties, Variations

Other articles related to "probable prime, prime":

Probable Prime - Variations
... An Euler probable prime to base a is an integer that is indicated prime by the somewhat stronger theorem that for any prime p, a(p − 1)/2 equals modulo p, where is ... An Euler probable prime which is composite is called an Euler–Jacobi pseudoprime to base a ... using the fact that the only square roots of 1 modulo a prime are 1 and −1 ...

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