Priority (fencing)

Priority (fencing)

Priority or "right of way" is the method used in foil and sabre fencing to determine which fencer receives the point if both fencers land a valid hit at the same time (if both fencers land a valid hit at the same time in épée fencing, they both receive a point). Because of this foil and sabre are considered conventional weapons.

Generally, priority is determined by first considering which fencer attacked first. In order to initiate an attack a fencer must threaten the target area of their opponent with the point of the foil while their arm is extending. When performing a compound attack the fencer must not withdraw the arm by bending the elbow.

These stipulations mean that, in the event of both fencers hitting with the tip, the hit made by a fencer that initiates an attack will have priority if:

  • the opponent attempts a stop-hit into a simple attack.
  • the opponent attempts a stop-hit into a compound attack but isn't in time.
  • the opponent attempts to avoid the touch but fails to do so.
  • the opponent parries the attack but pauses before the riposte.
  • while having the point in-line, the opponent's blade is deflected and returned to the in-line position without first parrying the attacker's blade.

The hit made by a fencer that is attacked will have priority over the hit of the attacker if:

  • the fencer already has the blade in the point-in-line position.
  • the attacker attempts to deflect the blade and fails to find it while the fencer hits the attacker.
  • the fencer beats the blade while the attacker is executing a compound attack and the attacker continues the attack anyway.
  • the attacker makes a pause or withdraws the arm during a compound attack during which the fencer hits the attacker.
  • the attacker is executing a compound attack and the fencer executes a stop-hit which is in time.
  • the fencer parries the attack and makes an immediate riposte.

Read more about Priority (fencing):  See Also

Famous quotes containing the word priority:

    It can be fairly argued that the highest priority for mankind is to save itself from extinction. However, it can also be argued that a society that neglects its children and robs them of their human potential can extinguish itself without an external enemy.
    Selma Fraiberg (20th century)