Press

Press may refer to:

Read more about Press:  Media, Machines, Other Uses

Other articles related to "press":

J. L. Mackie - Publications
... and Paradox (1973), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824402-9 ... Study of Causation (1974), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824642-0 ... Problems from Locke (1976), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-824555-6 ...
Freedom - Arts and Entertainment - Press
... Freedom Communications, privately held national media company headquartered in Irvine, California Freedom Magazine, Scientology publication Freedom (newspaper), British anarchist newspaper Freedom Press, British anarchist publishing house. ...
John Fell (bishop) - Career - Oxford University Press
... In the theatre was placed the Oxford University Press, the establishment of which had been a favourite project of Laud and now engaged a large share of Fell's energy ... to imagine how assiduous and drudging he is about his press." He sent for type and printers from Holland, declaring that "the foundation of all success must be laid in doing things well, which l am sure ...
J. L. Austin - Sources
... Oxford The Clarendon Press, 1973 ... New York Oxford University Press, 1990 ... Austin.New York Humanities Press, 1969 ...

Famous quotes containing the word press:

    The information links are like nerves that pervade and help to animate the human organism. The sensors and monitors are analogous to the human senses that put us in touch with the world. Data bases correspond to memory; the information processors perform the function of human reasoning and comprehension. Once the postmodern infrastructure is reasonably integrated, it will greatly exceed human intelligence in reach, acuity, capacity, and precision.
    Albert Borgman, U.S. educator, author. Crossing the Postmodern Divide, ch. 4, University of Chicago Press (1992)

    Whereas the comic confronts simply logical contradictions, the tragic confronts a moral predicament. Not minor matters of true and false but crucial questions of right and wrong, good and evil face the tragic character in a tragic situation.
    —Marie Collins Swabey. Comic Laughter, ch. 7, Yale University Press (1961)