Presidency Council of Iraq

The Presidency Council of Iraq was an entity that operated under the auspices of the "transitional provisions" of the Constitution of Iraq and previously under the Transitional Administrative Law.

The Presidency Council functioned in the role of the President of Iraq until one successive term after the Constitution was ratified and a government was seated. The Presidency council consisted of one President and two deputies, or Vice-Presidents, and the Presidency Council must have made all decisions unanimously.

The members of the Presidency Council were elected with "one list" by a two-thirds majority in the Iraqi Council of Representatives. The Presidency Council had the right to veto legislation passed by the Council of Representatives which may have overrode the veto with a three-fifths supermajority. Under the TAL the override required a two-thirds supermajority.

Read more about Presidency Council Of IraqHistory

Other articles related to "presidency council of iraq, presidency council, of iraq":

Presidency Council Of Iraq - History
... The first Presidency Council was elected by the National Assembly on 6 April 2005, after more than two months of negotiations between the United Iraqi Alliance ... The second Presidency Council, the first under the new Constitution of Iraq, consisted of President Jalal Talabani, and Vice Presidents Adel Abdul Mahdi and Tariq Al-Hashimi ...

Famous quotes containing the words presidency and/or council:

    Some of the offers that have come to me would never have come if I had not been President. That means these people are trying to hire not Calvin Coolidge, but a former President of the United States. I can’t make that kind of use of the office.... I can’t do anything that might take away from the Presidency any of its dignity, or any of the faith people have in it.
    Calvin Coolidge (1872–1933)

    Parental attitudes have greater correlation with pupil achievement than material home circumstances or variations in school and classroom organization, instructional materials, and particular teaching practices.
    —Children and Their Primary Schools, vol. 1, ch. 3, Central Advisory Council for Education, London (1967)