Prehistoric Iberia - Iron Age - Arrival of Romans and Punic Wars

Arrival of Romans and Punic Wars

During the 4th century BC, Rome began to rise as a Mediterranean power rival to Africa-based Carthage. After their defeat to Rome in the First Punic War (264–241 BC), the Carthaginians began to extend their conquest of Iberia to expand their empire further into Europe. In the Second Punic War (218–202 BC), Hannibal marched his armies, which included Iberians, from Africa through Iberia to cross the Alps and attack the Romans in Italy. Carthage was again defeated and lost Iberia. Rome began its conquest and occupation of the peninsula, thus beginning the era of Hispania.

Read more about this topic:  Prehistoric Iberia, Iron Age

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