Poverty

Poverty is the deprivation of food, shelter, money and clothing that occurs when people cannot satisfy their basic needs. Poverty can be understood simply as a lack of money, or more broadly in terms of barriers to everyday life.

Absolute poverty or destitution refers to the state of severe deprivation of basic human needs, which commonly includes food, water, sanitation, clothing, shelter, health care, education and information. Relative poverty is defined contextually as economic inequality in the location or society in which people live. For most of history poverty had been mostly accepted as inevitable as traditional modes of production were insufficient to give an entire population a comfortable standard of living. After the industrial revolution, mass production in factories made wealth increasingly more inexpensive and accessible. Of more importance is the modernization of agriculture, such as fertilizers, in order to provide enough yield to feed the population. People who practise asceticism intentionally live in economic poverty so as to attain spiritual wealth.

The World Bank estimated 1.29 billion people were living in absolute poverty in 2008. Of these, about 400 million people in absolute poverty lived in India and 173 million people in China. In terms of percentage of regional populations, sub-Saharan Africa at 47% had the highest incidence rate of absolute poverty in 2008. Between 1990 and 2010, about 663 million people moved above the absolute poverty level. Still, extreme poverty is a global challenge; it is observed in all parts of the world, including the developed economies.

The supply of basic needs can be restricted by constraints on government services such as corruption, debt and loan conditionalities and by the brain drain of health care and educational professionals. Strategies of increasing income to make basic needs more affordable typically include welfare, economic freedom, and providing financial services. Today, poverty reduction is a major goal and issue for many international organizations such as the United Nations and the World Bank.

Read more about PovertyCharacteristics, Poverty Reduction, Voluntary Poverty, Etymology

Other articles related to "poverty":

World Development Report - Previous Reports 1978-2007
... in the year 1978 with its first report titled "Prospects for Growth and Alleviation of Poverty." Since then, it has focused each year on a particular theme that is central to development and the ... Sineor manager shubham Aggarwal st xaviers 2000-01 Attacking Poverty 1990 Poverty 1980 Poverty and Human Development 1978 Prospects for Growth and Alleviation of Poverty ...
Poverty - Etymology
... The word poverty comes from old French poverté (Modern French pauvreté), from Latin paupertās, from pauper (poor) ... The English word "poverty" via Anglo-Norman povert ... There are several definitions of poverty depending on the context of the situation in is placed in and the views of the person giving the definition ...
Joseph Wresinski
... Born into poverty, Fr ... throughout his life in the fight against the worst forms of poverty, in collaboration with the very poor themselves and other partners ... He authored the report Grande pauvreté et précarité économique et sociale (Chronic Poverty and Lack of Basic Security), which was commissioned by the French Economic and Social Council, and later ...
Poverty In India - Efforts To Alleviate Poverty - Controversy Over Extent of Poverty Reduction
... The definition of poverty in India has been called into question by the UN World Food Programme ... index, it questioned the government of India's definition of poverty saying The fact that calorie deprivation is increasing during a period when the proportion of ... While total overall poverty in India has declined, the extent of poverty reduction is often debated ...

Famous quotes containing the word poverty:

    Common sense should tell us that reading is the ultimate weapon—destroying ignorance, poverty and despair before they can destroy us. A nation that doesn’t read much doesn’t know much. And a nation that doesn’t know much is more likely to make poor choices in the home, the marketplace, the jury box and the voting booth...The challenge, therefore, is to convince future generations of children that carrying a book is more rewarding than carrying guns.
    Jim Trelease (20th century)

    The poverty of our century is unlike that of any other. It is not, as poverty was before, the result of natural scarcity, but of a set of priorities imposed upon the rest of the world by the rich. Consequently, the modern poor are not pitied ... but written off as trash. The twentieth-century consumer economy has produced the first culture for which a beggar is a reminder of nothing.
    John Berger (b. 1926)

    ... the hey-day of a woman’s life is on the shady side of fifty, when the vital forces heretofore expended in other ways are garnered in the brain, when their thoughts and sentiments flow out in broader channels, when philanthropy takes the place of family selfishness, and when from the depths of poverty and suffering the wail of humanity grows as pathetic to their ears as once was the cry of their own children.
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902)