Pottawatomie Massacre

The Pottawatomie Massacre occurred during the night of May 24 and the morning of May 25, 1856. In reaction to the sacking of Lawrence (Kansas) by pro-slavery forces, John Brown and a band of abolitionist settlers (some of them members of the Pottawatomie Rifles) killed five settlers north of Pottawatomie Creek in Franklin County, Kansas. This was one of the many bloody episodes in Kansas preceding the American Civil War, which came to be known collectively as Bleeding Kansas. Bleeding Kansas was due to the Missouri Compromise and Kansas–Nebraska Act.

Read more about Pottawatomie Massacre:  Background, Attack

Other articles related to "pottawatomie massacre, pottawatomie":

Pottawatomie Massacre - Attack
... From there, they crossed the Pottawatomie, and some time after midnight, forced their way into the cabin of James Harris at sword-point ...
History Of Kansas - Kansas Territory - An Invitation To Violence - Bleeding Kansas
... of Bleeding Kansas include the Wakarusa War, the Sacking of Lawrence, the Pottawatomie Massacre, the Battle of Black Jack, the Battle of Osawatomie, and the Marais des ... Pottawatomie Massacre The Pottawatomie Massacre occurred during the night of May 24 to the morning of May 25, 1856 ... of Lawrence, John Brown and a band of abolitionists (some of them members of the Pottawatomie Rifles) killed five settlers, thought to be pro-slavery, north of Pottawatomie Creek ...

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