Postage Stamps and Postal History of The Indian States

Postage Stamps And Postal History Of The Indian States

For postage stamps and postal history of India, see Postage stamps and postal history of India

The postage stamps and postal history of the Indian Princely States is a complicated subject; British rule was not a uniform exercise of authority, and many states ran their own postal services. These Indian States were independent countries/kingdoms with defined boundaries and political systems. However all the princely states, referred to within this article, were subjugated by war or diplomacy by British India and as such not to be confused with truly independent states in the Indian sub-continent such as Nepal.

Read more about Postage Stamps And Postal History Of The Indian States:  Categorisation For Postal Purposes, The Convention States, The Feudatory States

Other articles related to "states, postal, stamps, stamp":

Postage Stamps And Postal History Of The Indian States - The Feudatory States
... India had a great many feudatory states, but not all issued postal stamps and/or stationery ... The feudatory states issuing stamps were as follows (the dates are the starting and ending dates of stamp issuance) Alwar (1877-1899) Bamra (1888-1893) Barwani (192 ... this is a challenging and an interesting area for stamp collecting ...

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    Designs in connection with postage stamps and coinage may be described, I think, as the silent ambassadors on national taste.
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    Designs in connection with postage stamps and coinage may be described, I think, as the silent ambassadors on national taste.
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