Postage Stamps and Postal History of The Azores

Postage Stamps And Postal History Of The Azores

Nearly all of the stamps issued for the Azores were stamps of Portugal, overprinted "AÇORES", of which the first appeared in 1868, continuing through 1930; after 1930, Portuguese stamps were used unmodified. The exceptions were the Vasco da Gama issue of 1898, the King Carlos issue of 1906, and the King Manuel issue and Manual revolutionary overprints of 1910.

Read more about Postage Stamps And Postal History Of The Azores:  Angra, Horta & Ponta Delgada, Modern Issues

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Postage Stamps And Postal History Of The Azores - Modern Issues
... On 2 January 1980, the use of separate stamps for the Azores (and Madeira) was revived ... The modern stamps are inscribed both "PORTUGAL" and "AÇORES" ... The stamps have no special purpose beyond the expression of local pride all are sold and valid in Portugal ...

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