Porch - North America

North America

In eastern North America and New England, a porch is a small area, usually unenclosed, that is at the main floor height usually used as a sitting area or for removal of working clothes so as not to get the interior of the house dirty, as the front door is accessed via the porch. In the Western United States, ranch style homes often use a covered porch to provide shade for the entrance and southern wall of the residence. In the Southern United States and Southern Ontario, Canada, a porch is often as broad as it is deep, and may provide sufficient space for residents to entertain guests or gather on special occasions. Older American homes, particularly those built during the era of Victorian Architecture, or the Queen Anne style, often included a porch in both the front and the back of the home. This is used as a sitting space as well. However, many American homes built since the 1940s with a porch only have a token one, (rear one) usually too small for comfortable social use and adding only to the visual impression of the building. The New Urbanism movement in architecture urges a reversal in this trend, recommending a large porch facing the street, to help build community ties.

When covered, a porch not only provides protection from sun or rain but may also form, in effect, an extra exterior room that may accommodate chairs, tables and other furniture, to be used as living space. Screens are often used in some areas to exclude flying insects.

Porches typically are architecturally unified with the rest of the house, using similar design elements as the rest of the structure, and may be integrated into the roof line or upper stories.

Read more about this topic:  Porch

Other articles related to "north america, north":

Usage of The Term North America
... The term North America maintains various definitions in accordance with location and context ... In English, North America may be used to refer to the United States and Canada together ... sometimes includes Greenland and Mexico (as in the North American Free Trade Agreement), as well as offshore islands ...
Tyrannosauridae - Distribution
... continents, tyrannosaurid fossils are known only from North America and Asia ... tyrannosaurids lived in the early Campanian stage in western North America ... Tyrannosaurid remains have never been recovered from eastern North America, while more basal tyrannosauroids like Dryptosaurus and Appalachiosaurus persisted there until the end of the Cretaceous, indicating that ...
Republic Of China Presidential Election, 2004 - Demographic Trends and Public Opinion
... ballots, large numbers of Taiwanese expatriates living in North America and Mainland China returned to Taiwan to vote ... indicate that about 20,000 people travelled from North America and between 100,000 and 150,000 people travelled from Mainland China ... Most analysts believe that the voters from North America would be split evenly between the two candidates, but that those from Mainland China voted overwhelmingly for Pan-Blue ...
House Sparrow - Systematics - Subspecies
... In North America, House Sparrow populations are more differentiated than those in Europe ... House Sparrow populations may be distinct enough to merit subspecies status, especially in North America and southern Africa, and American ornithologist Harry Church ... from Faiyum, Egypt, is found along the Nile north of Wadi Halfa, Sudan ...

Famous quotes containing the words america and/or north:

    The example of America must be the example, not merely of peace because it will not fight, but of peace because it is the healing and elevating influence of the world, and strife is not. There is such a thing as a man being too proud to fight. There is such a thing as a nation being so right that it does not need to convince others by force that it is right.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924)

    The discovery of the North Pole is one of those realities which could not be avoided. It is the wages which human perseverance pays itself when it thinks that something is taking too long. The world needed a discoverer of the North Pole, and in all areas of social activity, merit was less important here than opportunity.
    Karl Kraus (1874–1936)