Pomegranate - Etymology

Etymology

Pomegranate, arils only
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 346 kJ (83 kcal)
Carbohydrates 18.7 g
- Sugars 13.7 g
- Dietary fiber 4.0 g
Fat 1.2 g
Protein 1.7 g
Thiamine (vit. B1) 0.07 mg (6%)
Riboflavin (vit. B2) 0.05 mg (4%)
Niacin (vit. B3) 0.29 mg (2%)
Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.38 mg (8%)
Vitamin B6 0.08 mg (6%)
Folate (vit. B9) 38 μg (10%)
Vitamin C 10 mg (12%)
Calcium 10 mg (1%)
Iron 0.30 mg (2%)
Magnesium 12 mg (3%)
Phosphorus 36 mg (5%)
Potassium 236 mg (5%)
Zinc 0.35 mg (4%)
Percentages are relative to
US recommendations for adults.

The name pomegranate derives from medieval Latin pōmum "apple" and grānātum "seeded". This has influenced the common name for pomegranate in many languages (e.g. granada in Spanish, Granatapfel or Grenadine in German, grenade in French, granatäpple in Swedish, pomogranà in Venetian). Mālum grānātus, using the classical Latin word for apple, gives rise to the Italian name melograno, or less commonly melagrana.

Perhaps stemming from the old French word for the fruit, pomme-grenade, the pomegranate was known in early English as "apple of Grenada"—a term which today survives only in heraldic blazons. This is a folk etymology, confusing Latin granatus with the name of the Spanish city of Granada, which derives from Arabic.

The genus name Punica refers to the Phoenicians, who were active in broadening its cultivation, partly for religious reasons.

Garnet comes from Old French grenat by metathesis, from Medieval Latin granatum, here used in a different meaning: "of a dark red color". This meaning perhaps originated from pomum granatum because of the color of pomegranate pulp, or from granum in the sense of "red dye, cochineal".

The French term grenade for pomegranate has given its name to the military grenade. Soldiers commented on the similar shape of early grenades and the name entered common usage.

While most European languages have cognate names for the fruit, stemming from Latin granatum, an exception is the Portuguese term romã which is derived from Arabic ruman, and has cognates in other Semitic languages (e.g. Hebrew rimmon) and Ancient Egyptian rmn.

Other local names include Persian anâr, Hindi/Urdu and Punjabi anar, anaar, Sanskrit darima, dadima, Bengali dalim, bedana, Tamil madulai, and Romanian rodie.

Read more about this topic:  Pomegranate

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