Politics of Reality – Essays in Feminist Theory

Politics Of Reality – Essays In Feminist Theory

The Politics of Reality: Essays in Feminist Theory is a book published in 1983 containing a collection of feminist essays written by philosopher Marilyn Frye. Some of these essays, developed through speeches and lectures she gave, have been quoted and reprinted often, and the book has been a "classic" of feminist theory.

Read more about Politics Of Reality – Essays In Feminist Theory:  Concepts and Issues

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Politics Of Reality – Essays In Feminist Theory - Concepts and Issues
... book outlines several key concepts and fundamental issues for feminist theory ... In the first essay, Oppression, the author explains a structural vision of oppression The second essay, Sexism, clearly illustrates sexism as a specific form of ...

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