Political Psychology

Political psychology is an interdisciplinary academic field dedicated to understanding politics, politicians and political behavior from a psychological perspective. The relationship between politics and psychology is considered bi-directional, with psychology being used as a lens for understanding politics and politics being used as a lens for understanding psychology. As an interdisciplinary field, political psychology borrows from a wide range of other disciplines, including: anthropology, sociology, international relations, economics, philosophy, media, journalism and history.

Political psychology aims to understand interdependent relationships between individuals and contexts that are influenced by beliefs, motivation, perception, cognition, information processing, learning strategies, socialization and attitude formation. Political psychological theory and approaches have been applied in many contexts such as: leadership role; domestic and foreign policy making; behavior in ethnic violence, war and genocide; group dynamics and conflict; racist behavior; voting attitudes and motivation; voting and the role of the media; nationalism; and political extremism. In essence political psychologists study the foundations, dynamics, and outcomes of political behavior using cognitive and social explanations.

Read more about Political PsychologyPersonality and Politics, The Political Psychology of Groups

Other articles related to "political, political psychology, psychology":

Kristen Monroe
... Kristen Monroe (born May 17, 1946) is an American political scientist, specializing in political psychology and the scientific study of ethics ... a classic analysis of human altruism and its political significance ... She was also a significant figure in the Perestroika movement in Political Science ...
Negotiation Tactics - Bad Faith Negotiation - Inherent Bad Faith Model in International Relations and Political Psychology
... Bad faith in political science and political psychology refers to negotiating strategies in which there is no real intention to reach compromise, or a model of information processing ... The "inherent bad faith model" of information processing is a theory in political psychology that was first put forth by Ole Holsti to explain the relationship between John Foster Dulles’ beliefs and his ...
Negotiation Theory - Bad Faith Negotiation - Inherent Bad Faith Model in International Relations and Political Psychology
... Bad faith in political science and political psychology refers to negotiating strategies in which there is no real intention to reach compromise, or a model of information ... bad faith model" of information processing is a theory in political psychology that was first put forth by Ole Holsti to explain the relationship between John Foster Dulles’ beliefs and his ...
Jon Krosnick - Awards and Recognition
... Phillip Brickman Memorial Prize for Research in Social Psychology, 1984 ... Pi Sigma Alpha Award for the Best Paper Presented at the 1983 Midwest Political Science Association Annual Meeting, 1984 ... Elected Departmental Associate, Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, recognizing outstanding academic achievement, 1984 ...
Political Psychology - Using Psychology in The Understanding of Certain Political Behaviors - Terrorism
... In terms of explaining reasons for which individuals join terrorist groups, motivational theories such as need for power and need for affiliation intimacy are suggested ... Festinger (1954) explained that people often join groups in order to compare their own beliefs and attitudes ...

Famous quotes containing the words psychology and/or political:

    A large part of the popularity and persuasiveness of psychology comes from its being a sublimated spiritualism: a secular, ostensibly scientific way of affirming the primacy of “spirit” over matter.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933)

    I would like you to understand completely, also emotionally, that I’m a political detainee and will be a political prisoner, that I have nothing now or in the future to be ashamed of in this situation. That, at bottom, I myself have in a certain sense asked for this detention and this sentence, because I’ve always refused to change my opinion, for which I would be willing to give my life and not just remain in prison. That therefore I can only be tranquil and content with myself.
    Antonio Gramsci (1891–1937)