Pokémon: The Movie 2000

Pokémon: The Movie 2000, originally released in Japan as Pocket Monsters the Movie: Revelation Lugia (劇場版ポケットモンスター 幻のポケモン ルギア爆誕, Gekijōban Poketto Monsutā Maboroshi no Pokemon Rugia Bakutan?, lit. "Mirage Pokémon: Lugia's Explosive Birth"), is a 1999 Japanese animated film directed by Kunihiko Yuyama as the second Pokémon feature-length film, complementing the Orange Islands saga of the series and featuring several new Pokémon, including Lugia and Slowking. Brock, who temporarily left during the season on which the film is based makes a cameo appearance trying to protect the Pokémon in Professor Ivy's lab.

Pokémon: The Movie 2000 has two parts: the feature presentation and a 20-minute short. The film is set during the Orange Islands saga, where Ash, Misty and Tracy enter Shamouti Island. While there, they discover the three legendary Pokémon, Moltres, Zapdos and Articuno. When a collector named Lawrence III attempts to steal the three Pokémon and Lugia attempts to stop him, the fate between Ash, Lawrence III and Lugia is at stake.

The film was released in Japanese theaters on July 17, 1999. The English version, produced by 4Kids Entertainment and distributed by Warner Bros. in association with Nintendo, was later released in the United States on July 21, 2000. Pokémon: The Movie 2000 earned less at the box office than its predecessor, Pokémon: The First Movie, despite increased promotion and better critical reception.

Read more about Pokémon: The Movie 2000:  Release, Soundtrack

Other articles related to "2000, movie":

Pokémon: The Movie 2000 - Soundtrack - Political Usage
... them in his official campaign announcement, misattributing them to the closing song of the 2000 Olympics ... In a December interview with GQ, Cain acknowledged that the song came from a Pokémon movie, but reiterated that he heard it during the close of the 2000 Olympics and stated that he had not previously known ... lyrics, acknowledging that they came from a Pokémon movie ...

Famous quotes containing the word movie:

    My movie is born first in my head, dies on paper; is resuscitated by the living persons and real objects I use, which are killed on film but, placed in a certain order and projected on to a screen, come to life again like flowers in water.
    Robert Bresson (b. 1907)