Poggio Picenze - History - Modern Era

Modern Era

In the late 19th century, Poggio Picenze would experience out migration that affected most of Italy, where 75 percent of the population would leave in the span of a century. Despite air raids on nearby L’Aquila during World War II, Poggio Picenze’s historical buildings remained relatively unscathed .

In 2009, Poggio Picenze would suffer fatalities from an earthquake that occurred at 3:32 local time (1:32 UTC) on 6 April 2009, and was rated 5.8 on the Richter scale and 6.3 on the moment magnitude scale; its epicenter was near L'Aquila, the capital of Abruzzo, which together with surrounding villages suffered the most damage. There have been several thousand aftershocks since, and more than thirty of which had a Richter magnitude greater than 3.5.

Read more about this topic:  Poggio Picenze, History

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