Plough Sunday

Plough Sunday is a traditional English celebration of the beginning of the agricultural year that has seen some revival over recent years. Plough Sunday celebrations usually involve bringing a ploughshare into a church with prayers for the blessing of the land. It is traditionally held on the Sunday after Epiphany, the Sunday between 7 January and 13 January. Accordingly, work in the fields did not begin until the day after Plough Sunday: Plough Monday.

As well as a ploughshare, in rural areas, it is common for local farmers to attend the service with their tractors - both new and old (see photo).

Famous quotes containing the words sunday and/or plough:

    Give a lift to a tomato, you expect her to be nice, don’t ya? After all, what kind of dames thumb rides, Sunday school teachers?
    Martin Goldsmith, and Edgar G. Ulmer. Charles Haskell, Jr. (Edmund MacDonald)

    We grant no dukedoms to the few,
    We hold like rights and shall;—
    Equal on Sunday in the pew,
    On Monday in the mall.
    For what avail the plough or sail,
    Or land or life, if freedom fail?
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)