Platform Shoes

Some articles on platform shoes, platform shoe, shoes, platform:

Platform Shoe - History - Modern
... Platform shoes enjoyed some popularity in the United States, Europe and the UK from the 1930s to the 1950s, but not nearly to the extent of their popularity from the 1960s to the 1980s ... The biggest, and most prolonged, platform shoe fad in history began as early as 1967 (appearing in both advertisements and articles in 1970 issues of Seventeen ... Although platform shoes did provide added height without the discomfort of spike heels, they seem to have been worn primarily for the sake of attracting attention ...
Platform Shoe
... Platform shoes (also known as disco boots) are shoes, boots, or sandals with thick soles at least four inches in height ... made of cork, plastic, rubber, or wood (wooden-soled platform shoes are, technically, also clogs) ... Platform shoes have been worn, for reasons such as fashion or added height, in various cultures since the Ancient era ...
High-heeled Footwear - History
... depict an early version of shoes worn mostly by the higher classes ... In ancient Greece and Rome, platform sandals called kothorni, later known as buskins in the Renaissance, were shoes with high wood or cork soles that were popular particularly among actors who would wear ... Pattens would attach to fragile and expensive shoes to keep them out of the mud and other street debris when walking outdoors (Swann, 1984) ...

Famous quotes containing the words shoes and/or platform:

    You know, I have a method all my own. If you’ll notice, the coat came first, then the tie, then the shirt. Now, according to Hoyle, after that the pants should be next. There’s where I’m different. I go for the shoes next. First the right, then the left. After that, it’s every man for himself.
    Robert Riskin (1897–1955)

    I marched in with the men afoot; a gallant show they made as they marched up High Street to the depot. Lucy and Mother Webb remained several hours until we left. I saw them watching me as I stood on the platform at the rear of the last car as long as they could see me. Their eyes swam. I kept my emotion under control enough not to melt into tears.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)