Plaquemine Culture

The Plaquemine culture was an archaeological culture in the lower Mississippi River Valley in western Mississippi and eastern Louisiana. Good examples of this culture are the Medora Site ( the type site for the culture and period) in West Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, and the Anna, Emerald Mound, Winterville and Holly Bluff sites located in Mississippi. Plaquemine culture was contemporaneous with the Middle Mississippian culture in the Cahokia site in St. Louis, Missouri. It is considered ancestral to the Natchez and Taensa Peoples.

Read more about Plaquemine CulturePlaquemine Mississippian, Plaquemine Sites, See Also

Other articles related to "plaquemine culture, culture, plaquemine":

Plaquemine Culture - See Also
... Mississippian culture Culture, phase, and chronological table for the Mississippi Valley. ...
Natchez People - History - Prehistoric
... Natchez were preceded in this area by what archaeologists call the indigenous Plaquemine culture, part of the larger, prehistoric Mississippian culture ... Archaeological evidence indicates that people of the Plaquemine culture, an elaboration of the Coles Creek culture, had lived in the Natchez Bluffs region since at least as long ago as 700 ... During the late prehistoric era, around 1500, Plaquemine-culture people occupied territory from the Big Black River in the north to about the Homochitto ...
Mound Builder (people) - Mound Building Cultures - Plaquemine Culture
... This was an archaeological culture in the lower Mississippi River Valley in western Mississippi and eastern Louisiana ... Good examples of this culture's constructions are found at the Medora Site in West Baton Rouge Parish, La and the Anna, Emerald Mound, Winterville and Holly Bluff (Lake George) sites in ... Plaquemine culture was contemporaneous with the Middle Mississippian culture at the Cahokia site in Illinois ...

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