Plains Indians

The Plains Indians are the Indigenous peoples who live on the plains and rolling hills of the Great Plains of North America. Their equestrian culture and resistance to domination by Canada and the United States have made the Plains Indians an archetype in literature and art for American Indians everywhere. Plains Indians are usually divided into two broad classifications which overlap to some degree. The first group became fully nomadic and dependent upon the horse during the 18th and 19th centuries, following the vast herds of buffalo, although some tribes occasionally engaged in agriculture; growing tobacco and corn primarily. These include the Blackfoot, Arapaho, Assiniboine, Cheyenne, Comanche, Crow, Gros Ventre, Kiowa, Lakota Sioux, Lipan, Plains Apache (or Kiowa Apache), Plains Cree, Plains Ojibwe, Sarsi, Nakoda (Stoney), and Tonkawa.

The second group of plains Indians includes the aboriginal peoples of the Great Plains, as well as the Prairie Indians who come from as far east as the Mississippi River. These tribes were semi-sedentary, and, in addition to hunting buffalo, they lived in villages, raised crops, and actively traded with other tribes. These include the Arikara, Hidatsa, Iowa, Kaw (or Kansa), Kitsai, Mandan, Missouria, Omaha, Osage, Otoe, Pawnee, Ponca, Quapaw, Wichita, and the Santee, Yanktonai and Yankton Sioux.

Read more about Plains IndiansCulture, Women, The Horse, Hunting in The Plains, Clothing, Great Plains Religion, Research

Other articles related to "plains indians, plains, plains indian, indian, indians":

Plains Indians - Research
... The tribes of the Great Plains have been found to be the tallest people in the world during the late 19th century, based on 21st century analysis of data collected by Franz Boas for the World Columbian ...
Contrary (social Role) - Social Role
... The social role of the Plains Indian clowns was ceremonial since they performed primarily during rituals, dances and feasts ... The Contraries of the Plains Indians were unique and historically unprecedented ... of contrary behavior, particularly in the tribes of the North American Plains Indians ...
Wichita People - History
... been related to the Wichita and the earlier Plains villagers ... east from New Mexico, crossing the Great Plains and encountering two large settlements of people he called Escanjaques (possibly Wichita) and Rayados, most certainly Wichita ... They adopted many traits of the nomadic Plains Indians and were noted for raiding, trading, and (reputedly) cannibalism ...
Battle Of Little Robe Creek - Reasons For The Texas Rangers' Success At Little Robe Creek
... Changing Military Patterns on the Great Plains" the Comanche, and other plains Indians, had combined mastery of horsemanship while incorporating first, their native weapons of bow and lance, then single ... of cold camp and relentless pursuit to the Indian encampments ... deployment of rapid rate firearms destroyed the tactics the plains Indians had developed and used with such success against the Spanish, Mexicans, and early Americans ...
History Of The Midwestern United States - History - American Indian - Great Plains Indians
... The Plains Indians are the indigenous peoples who live on the plains and rolling hills of the Great Plains of North America ... Their colorful equestrian culture and resistance to white domination have made the Plains Indians archetypical in literature and art for American Indians everywhere ... Plains Indians are usually divided into two broad classifications which overlap to some degree ...

Famous quotes containing the words indians and/or plains:

    But where is laid the sailor John
    That so many lands had known,
    Quiet lands or unquiet seas
    Where the Indians trade or Japanese?
    He never found his rest ashore,
    Moping for one voyage more.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    We hold on to hopes for next year every year in western Dakota: hoping that droughts will end; hoping that our crops won’t be hailed out in the few rainstorms that come; hoping that it won’t be too windy on the day we harvest, blowing away five bushels an acre; hoping ... that if we get a fair crop, we’ll be able to get a fair price for it. Sometimes survival is the only blessing that the terrifying angel of the Plains bestows.
    Kathleen Norris (b. 1947)