Pixel Aspect Ratio

Pixel aspect ratio (often abbreviated PAR) is a mathematical ratio that describes how the width of a pixel in a digital image compares to the height of that pixel.

Most digital imaging systems display an image as a grid of tiny, square pixels. However, some imaging systems, especially those that must be compatible with standard-definition television motion pictures, display an image as a grid of rectangular pixels, in which the pixel width and height are different. Pixel Aspect Ratio describes this difference.

Use of pixel aspect ratio mostly involves pictures pertaining to standard-definition television and some other exceptional cases. Most other imaging systems, including those that comply with SMPTE standards and practices, use square pixels.

Read more about Pixel Aspect RatioIntroduction, Background, Inconsistency in Defined Pixel Aspect Ratio Values, Modern Standards and Practices, Issues of Non-square Pixels, Use of Pixel Aspect Ratio, Confusion With Display Aspect Ratio, Pixel Aspect Ratios of Common Video Formats

Other articles related to "aspect, pixel aspect ratio, pixels, pixel aspect ratios, aspect ratio, ratio, pixel, ratios":

Aspect
... Aspect may be Aspect (computer programming), a feature that is linked to many parts of a program, but which is not necessarily the primary function of the program ... Grammatical aspect, in linguistics, a component of the conjugation of a verb, having to do with the internal temporal flow of an event Lexical aspect, in linguistics ... a Japanese video game company Warner Aspect, an imprint of the publishing company Warner Books, focusing on works of science fiction People Alain Aspect, a French physicist Aspect may also refer to In ...
Aspects
... Aspect may be Aspect (computer programming), a feature that is linked to many parts of a program, but which is not necessarily the primary function of the program ... Grammatical aspect, in linguistics, a component of the conjugation of a verb, having to do with the internal temporal flow of an event Lexical aspect, in linguistics, a ... a Japanese video game company Warner Aspect, an imprint of the publishing company Warner Books, focusing on works of science fiction People Alain Aspect, a French physicist Aspect may also refer to In railway ...
Standard-definition Television - Pixel Aspect Ratio
... Television signals are transmitted in digital form, and their pixels have a rectangular shape, as opposed to square pixels that are used in modern ... The table below summarizes pixel aspect ratios for various kinds of SDTV video signal ... image (be it 43 or 169) is always contained in the center 704 horizontal pixels of the digital frame, regardless of how many horizontal pixels (704 or 720) are used ...
Aspect Ratio (image) - Distinctions
... Further information Pixel aspect ratio This article primarily addresses the aspect ratio of images as displayed, which is more formally referred to as the Display Aspect Ratio (DAR) ... In digital images, there is a distinction with the Storage Aspect Ratio (SAR), which is the ratio of pixel dimensions ... If an image is displayed with square pixels, then these ratios agree if not, then non-square, "rectangular" pixels are used, and these ratios disagree ...
Pixel Aspect Ratios of Common Video Formats
... Pixel aspect ratio values for common standard-definition video formats are listed below ... Note that for each video format, two different types of pixel aspect ratio values are listed Rec.601, a Rec.601-compliant value, which is considered the ... SDTV Resolution for a table of storage, display and pixel aspect ratios ...

Famous quotes containing the words ratio and/or aspect:

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