Pittsburgh Metropolitan Area

The Pittsburgh metropolitan area (also called Greater Pittsburgh Southwestern Pennsylvania or the Pittsburgh Tri-State) is the largest population center in both the Ohio River Valley and Appalachia. The metropolitan area consists of the city of Pittsburgh in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and surrounding counties. By many definitions the area extends into the U.S. states of West Virginia and Ohio. The larger "tri-state" region is defined by the U.S. Census as the Combined Statistical Area (CSA) while definitions of the Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) are within Pennsylvania.

The area is renowned for its industries including steel, glass and oil; its economy also thrives on healthcare, education, technology, robotics, financial services and the film industry. The region is an emergent area for oil and natural gas companies' Marcellus shale production. The city is headquarters to major global financial institutions including PNC Financial Services (the nation's fifth-largest bank), Federated Investors and the regional headquarters of BNY Mellon.

Read more about Pittsburgh Metropolitan AreaDefinition, Communities, Townships, Demographics, Sports, Area Codes, See Also

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Pittsburgh Metropolitan Area - See Also
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