Pilgrims Pioneers - The History and Speeches of The Science Fiction Research Association Award Winn

Famous quotes containing the words research, association, winn, fiction, award, pioneers, pilgrims, history, speeches and/or science:

    ... research is never completed ... Around the corner lurks another possibility of interview, another book to read, a courthouse to explore, a document to verify.
    Catherine Drinker Bowen (1897–1973)

    They that have grown old in a single state are generally found to be morose, fretful and captious; tenacious of their own practices and maxims; soon offended by contradiction or negligence; and impatient of any association but with those that will watch their nod, and submit themselves to unlimited authority.
    Samuel Johnson (1709–1784)

    The new concept of the child as equal and the new integration of children into adult life has helped bring about a gradual but certain erosion of these boundaries that once separated the world of children from the word of adults, boundaries that allowed adults to treat children differently than they treated other adults because they understood that children are different.
    —Marie Winn (20th century)

    ... fiction never exceeds the reach of the writer’s courage.
    Dorothy Allison (b. 1949)

    The award of a pure gold medal for poetry would flatter the recipient unduly: no poem ever attains such carat purity.
    Robert Graves (1895–1985)

    The emancipation of today displays itself mainly in cigarettes and shorts. There is even a reaction from the ideal of an intellectual and emancipated womanhood, for which the pioneers toiled and suffered, to be seen in painted lips and nails, and the return of trailing skirts and other absurdities of dress which betoken the slave-woman’s intelligent companionship.
    Sylvia Pankhurst (1882–1960)

    Like pilgrims to th’appointed place we tend;
    The world’s an inn, and death the journey’s end.
    John Dryden (1631–1700)

    It is true that this man was nothing but an elemental force in motion, directed and rendered more effective by extreme cunning and by a relentless tactical clairvoyance .... Hitler was history in its purest form.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    It was a maxim with Mr. Brass that the habit of paying compliments kept a man’s tongue oiled without any expense; and that, as that useful member ought never to grow rusty or creak in turning on its hinges in the case of a practitioner of the law, in whom it should be always glib and easy, he lost few opportunities of improving himself by the utterance of handsome speeches and eulogistic expressions
    Charles Dickens (1812–1870)

    The whole of science is nothing more than a refinement of everyday thinking.
    Albert Einstein (1879–1955)